IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT (ITSM OR IT SERVICES) IS A DISCIPLINE FOR MANAGEING IT SYSTEMS. ITSM STANDS IN DELIBERATE CONTRAST TO TECHNOLOGY-CENTRED APPROACHES TO IT MANAGEMENT AND BUSINESS INTERACTION.

NO LONGER AFFORD TO FOCUS ON TECHNOLOGY AND THEIR INTERNAL ORGANIZATION, AND THEY NOW HAVE TO CONSIDER THE QUALITY OF THE SERVICES THEY PROVIDE AND FOCUS ON THE RELATIONSHIP WITH CUSTOMERS.

ITSM is process-focused and in this sense has ties and common interests with process improvement movement frameworks and methodologies. The discipline is not concerned with the details of how to use a particular vendor’s product, or necessarily with the technical details of the systems under management. Instead, it focuses upon providing a framework to structure IT-related activities and the interactions of IT technical personnel with business customers and users.
ITSM is generally concerned with the operational concerns of information technology management, and not with technology development. For example, the process of writing computer software for sale, or designing a microprocessor would not be the focus of the discipline, but the computer systems used by marketing and business development staff in software and hardware companies would be. Many non-technology companies, such as those in the financial, retail, and travel industries, have significant information technology systems which are not exposed to customers.
Service Management is often equated with the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) publication. However, while a version of ITSM is a component of ITIL, ITIL also covers a number of related but distinct disciplines and the two are not synonymous.
The current version of the ITIL framework is the 2011 edition. The 2011 edition, published in July 2011, is a revision of the previous edition known as ITIL version 3. Since ITIL V3, the various ITIL processes are grouped into 5 stages of the service lifecycle:

  • Service Strategy – Strategy Management, Service Portfolio Management, Financial Management of IT Services, Demand Management, Business relationship management
  • Service Design – Design coordination, Service Catalogue, Service level Management, Availability Management, Capacity Management, IT Service Continuity Management (ITSCM), Information Security Management System, Supplier Management
  • Service Transition – Transition planning and support, Change management, Service asset and configuration management, Release and deployment management, Service validation and testing, Change evaluation, Knowledge management
  • Service Operation – Event management, Incident management, Request fulfillment, Problem management, Access management
  • Continual Service Improvement (or CSI).Aim assist companies in reviewing, assessing and developing their IT Service Management procedures, contact us here to find out how we can help you